?

Log in

No account? Create an account

Previous entry | Next Entry

He know's when you've been bad...

Colin at Chronic Pain Lifestyle wrote an excellent entry about morality and chronic pain. It's always fascinating that sometimes just the right post comes through my RSS reader. Read Colin's reflections, because they're extremely insightful.

Lately, i've been struggling with the guilts and shoulld'ves, could'ves and saying very negative things to and about myself. It's incredibly hard to think of myself in a positive light when the pain seems to scream "You're no good," or you hear comments about your need for medications, or you are overtired, and agitated. I guarantee that almost anything critical said to me has already been said by myself to myself. It's very easy to focus on the bad things I do, and how I've fallen short.

But I'm starting to remember that that's not healthy. I'm starting to remember that there are good things I've done. My ppain is not a sign of being an awwful person.

Thanks, Colin, for a great post!


    Chronic Pain Lifestyle: A Fearful Moral Inventory:
   

The reasons, besides the genuine need for self-care for everyon on the planet that I need to be cognesant of these self-care needs is that without self-care, I'm not effective at helping anyone. It came up in the complementary health course yesterday (and pretty much every day), it's come up in social work, and it comes up more than once daily in my feeds I read and other discussions about dealing with any disorder. I don't think, as a whole, society takes care of itself. But, as Isabella Morri from Moritherapy explains, we need to
Care for Ourselves.

This includes watching for negative thought patterns. What if, every morning and every evening, we actually took some time to think of good things that have happened in our lives or good things we've done? It's just a thought that crossed my brain.

Tags

Latest Month

August 2017
S M T W T F S
  12345
6789101112
13141516171819
20212223242526
2728293031  
Powered by LiveJournal.com
Designed by Lilia Ahner